Archive for elementary education

Apr
07

Green Thumbs

Posted by: | Comments (0)

The second grade students are trying out their green thumbs.

The Regents second grade teacher, Mrs. Melissa Griner, has led her students to plant a vegetable garden behind the school building. The students are having a blast. Not only do they get to learn about gardening and play in the dirt, but they get to taste their hard work, as it produces delicious tomatoes, peppers, cucumbers, squash, watermelons, and strawberries.

The class has gotten help from several members of the Regents family. Mr. Bobby Phillips (Mrs. Shannon Henry’s father and Caleb and Mitchell Henry’s grandfather) has been the class’s gardening consultant. He also tilled up the ground for the garden. Mrs. Jolene Monlezun helped the class get a grant from Walmart to buy seeds, tools, and fertilizer.

Pictured below are the second grade class and also Mrs. Griner. Just one more proof that hard work can be fun and rewarding! And another wonderful way for our students to learn about and enjoy God’s wonderful creation. The second grade class includes Levi Bertke, Abigail Freeland, Sophie Jordan, Ella Milliken, Cody Monlezun, Hayli Stanaland, Reagan Taylor,  Clayton Terrell, Connor Tolson, and Trinity Tyre.


Sep
03

Why Memorize Scripture?

Posted by: | Comments (0)

Last year Regents Academy began a school-wide Scripture memory program. Each month the students memorize passages from the Bible and then recite them before their classmates. We’ve seen wonderful success from this memorization program, and it is continuing this school year. Why are we using valuable time and effort to memorize Scripture?

First, we memorize Scripture because we are a Christian school. I’m only being halfway facetious. A school can, of course, be a Christian school without a Bible memorization program, but on the other hand, would you expect a school that is not Christian to memorize God’s Word? Psalm 1 teaches us that God blesses the man who does not “walk in the counsel of the ungodly” but instead delights in His law and “in His law he meditates day and night.” The psalmist said, “Your word I have hidden in my heart, that I might not sin against You” (Ps 119:11). St. Paul reminded Timothy that he had known the Holy Scriptures since his childhood, and he had grown wise in salvation as a result (2 Tim 3:15). In the early centuries of the church, prospective church leaders were often required to memorize all 150 psalms. There are tremendous spiritual benefits to hiding God’s Word in our minds and hearts. We are better able to listen to God and trust in Him while meditating on His promises and commands.

Memorizing Scripture accords well with the methodology of classical education. In the grammar phase of the Trivium students memorize large volumes of information: spelling rules, history facts, multiplication tables, as well as lots of names, dates, and places. Young children, of course, don’t understand the significance of all that they are memorizing, but we teach it to them over and over again until it is rote, and then later that knowledge will be developed as their ability to understand grows. Likewise, children may not understand all that they are called upon to memorize when they learn Bible passages. But as we place God’s words in their hearts and minds, it affects them nonetheless and is tucked away safely for later days when it will be understood better. Older students in the logic and rhetoric schools, with their greater capacity for understanding, receive great benefit from memorizing the Bible as they consider what it means and how it connects to a Christian worldview.

Bible memorization also helps develop recitation skills. Students at Regents Academy recite a lot: Latin conjugations, poems, prayers, memorized pieces. As students grow up through the Trivium, they are trained to recite and speak to audiences with confidence and poise, with a strong voice, and with rhetorical skill. Memorized Bible passages, then, are another training tool in preparing students to be persuasive, winsome public speakers. Francis Bacon famously asserted that “Reading maketh a full man; conference a ready man; and writing an exact man.” We might add that recitation maketh an eloquent man.

Finally, I can say from my own experience that a school-sponsored Scripture memorization program has provided good accountability for my home. Busyness, distractions, and laziness keep me from making Bible memorization a priority. But with the Bible being consistently placed in the minds of my children at school, I can call on that knowledge and be better equipped to lead my children to honor and trust Christ.

I encourage us all to see the value of memorizing the Bible and thank the Lord for yet another gift He has given us through classical Christian education at Regents Academy.

Categories : from the headmaster
Comments (0)

Regents Academy has openings in its K-prep and K5 classes for 2010-2011. Call (936) 559-7343 now for information about the school or to enroll for next school year. There are openings in both these classes now, but these opening may not last for long.

The Regents K-prep program is a full day kindergarten program for 4-year-olds, while the K5 program is a full-day program for 5-year-olds.

Regents Academy is a K-12 classical Christian school located on 10 acres in Nacogdoches, Texas, and offers excellent academics and discipleship for Christian families in East Texas. The Regents Academy facility has recently undergone major renovations and expansion. The school’s classical curriculum and teachers are second to none.

If you have rising kindergarteners in your home, please call Mrs. Mary Ann Bentley now at the Regents school office at (936) 559-7343.

We look forward to hearing from you.

Comments (0)

I recently celebrated another birthday (I think it was my 21st) and some of my students created a very touching card for me. They reminisced about some old times that we had last year, but more than that they thanked me for loving and caring for them as a temporary mom! I was raised not to be given to tears but upon receiving the sentimental birthday wishes, I couldn’t hold a wave of them back. I enjoyed a few more happy tears during the day and reminded myself that it is all worth it! I love teaching!

Comments (0)

Theodore Roosevelt said,

It is not the critic that counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly, who errs, and comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; but who does actually strive to do the deeds.

So could I also add or infer that the credit belongs to the teacher who is actually in the classroom, whose hands are marred by Expo marker and blouse messed by drying dirty tears and feet aching because sitting isn’t an option if you want children to actually learn; who strives valiantly to teach “how to solve for X,” and comes short again and again in turning in Teacher Notes on time, because there is no effort without lots of error and numerous shortcomings in their own character; but the credit belongs to the teacher that rises early every morning and thinks about his students on the way to school and who most certainly strives endlessly to make this arrow better?

Do you think T.R. would mind taking some liberties in his well stated exhortation?

Comments (0)

Like arrows in the hand of a warrior,
So are the children of one’s youth.
Psalms 127:4

Here is my job description, simply stated.   Living in a small town of East Texas, driving used vehicles, teaching in an old day-care building, rubbing shoulders daily with people who bet that “ain’t ” is in the dictionary, this seems to be a high calling for someone like me.   God is in the business of issuing high callings, or tall orders to seemingly small and insignificant people.   Just thinking of Mary’s birth story or David’s size when taking on Goliath or Abraham’s trek in the wilderness and one realizes God expects great things out of his rather small people.   Here we are in a rural Southern town and God has asked or rather required me to prepare His arrows, sharpen their points and ensure that they will fly straight when released into flight.   This is God’s story and I’m simply a small character trying my best to play my part to the glory of God.   Some days will be foggy, a few will be rainy, but most days will be sunny with a sure chance of God’s goodness.

Comments (1)

Regents Academy Blog
Copyright @2016 All Rights Reserved

A Classical and Christian School
in Nacogdoches, Texas