Jul
30

Welcome, Rebecca Higdon

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Regents Academy is very happy to welcome its new Art and Drama teacher, Mrs. Rebecca Higdon to its faculty for 2015-16.

The school’s longtime Art and Drama teacher, Ashley Bryant, stepped away from the position after the 2014-15 school year, and Mrs. Higdon has stepped into this role of inspiring creativity for Regents students. Mrs. Higdon will bring wonderful enthusiasm, creativity, and joy to our campus, and we welcome her!

rebeccahigdon

Categories : hellos and goodbyes
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Jul
24

Welcome, Anna Vermillion

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We are glad to welcome a new teacher to our excellent faculty for 2015-16. Regents Academy’s new KPrep teacher is Mrs. Anna Vermillion, wife of Regents Academic Dean Lance Vermillion. Mrs. Vermillion is certainly no stranger to our community, and she brings a wonderful knowledge of classical Christian education and a kind, peaceful demeanor to our 4-year-old classroom.

After our much beloved Kindergarten teacher, LaWanna Smith, retired last year, our previous KPrep teacher,  Janet Duke, moved up to teach Kindergarten. It is a great blessing now to have Mrs. Duke and Mrs. Vermillion teaming up to teach our youngest students.

Welcome, Mrs. Vermillion!

av

Categories : hellos and goodbyes
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Jul
21

New Building on the Way

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Regents Academy continues to grow (for which we thank the Lord), and so we continue to need space. In order to meet this need, the Regents board decided to install a new portable building on the south side of our main building in order to provide space for two additional classrooms. The 5th and 6th grade classes will meet in these new classrooms. The building is being completed right now and should he put in place next week.

This building is sturdy, attractive, and spacious, and it will supply much needed classroom space. The classrooms will be ready to go by the day of orientations.

Here are a couple of pictures that show the progress being made by Lunsford Buildings in Center.

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Categories : school life
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Jul
04

Indispensable Supports

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Of all the dispositions and habits which lead to political prosperity, religion and morality are indispensable supports. In vain would that man claim the tribute of patriotism who should labor to subvert these great pillars of human happiness, these firmest props of the duties of men and citizens. The mere politician, equally with the pious man, ought to respect and to cherish them. A volume could not trace all their connections with private and public felicity [happiness]. Let it simply be asked, “Where is the security for property, for reputation, for life, if the sense of religious obligations desert the oaths, which are the instruments of investigation in courts of justice?”

And let us w̲i̲t̲h̲ c̲a̲u̲t̲i̲o̲n̲ indulge the supposition that morality can be maintained without religion. Whatever may be conceded to the influence of refined education on minds of peculiar structure, reason and experience both forbid us to expect that national morality can prevail in exclusion of religious principle. ‘Tis substantially true that virtue or morality is a necessary spring of popular government. The rule, indeed, extends with more or less force to every species of free government. Who that is a sincere friend to it [free government] can look with indifference upon attempts to shake the foundation of the fabric?

George Washington, Farewell Address, 1796

Categories : quotable
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Forasmuch as each man is a part of the human race, and human nature is something social, and has for a great and natural good, the power also of friendship; on this account God willed to create all men out of one, in order that they might be held in their society not only by likeness of kind, but also by bond of kindred. Therefore the first natural bond of human society is man and wife. Nor did God create these each by himself, and join them together as alien by birth: but He created the one out of the other, setting a sign also of the power of the union in the side, whence she was drawn, was formed. For they are joined one to another side by side, who walk together, and look together whither they walk. Then follows the connection of fellowship in children, which is the one alone worthy fruit, not of the union of male and female, but of the sexual intercourse. For it were possible that there should exist in either sex, even without such intercourse, a certain friendly and true union of the one ruling, and the other obeying.

St. Augustine, On the Good of Marriage (De Bono Conjugali) 401 A.D.

Categories : quotable
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Jul
02

Welcome, David Henry

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We are happy to welcome David Henry to the Regents Academy faculty for the 2015-16 school year.

David is an alumnus of Regents, having graduated in 2010. David graduated from New St. Andrews College with his B.A. in May, and now he returns to his hometown to teach Latin 1, 6th grade history, 8th grade Omnibus (Christendom 1), and Government.

We are excited to welcome him and look forward to his presence on our campus once again, this time in a new role!

d henry

Categories : hellos and goodbyes
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Jun
29

RA Commencement 2015

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Regents Academy was honored to host Dr. Laurence White at our school’s commencement ceremony on May 29, 2015. I hope you will take the time to listen (or listen again) — you’ll be glad you did.

Categories : graduation
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graduation 2015sm

Categories : graduation
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May
28

Some Summer Advice

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As we close out the school year (it’s late May, all of a sudden!), I find that my thoughts turn to the long, hot days of summer. I think of the change of pace, planned trips and times with family, a slowdown in the demands of school, and the fact that it flies by every year. My musings inspired me to offer some random bits of advice for the summer months.

Make this the summer of the book instead of the summer of the screen. One sure way to lose academic ground is to allow our children to give themselves over nonstop to the passive entertainment of electronics rather than to the active pursuit of the good, the true, and the beautiful through books. Certainly, screen time is a welcome form of amusement and fun. But beware too much screen time, to the neglect of the joy of reading. Henry David Thoreau famously wrote, “How many a man has dated a new era in his life from the reading of a book.” I doubt that a few generations from now someone will ponder how a new app or a video game changed his life. But books will never lose their power.

Make a Bible reading plan for the summer. This is something my family has done for several years now. We all read the same Bible passages each day and then hold each other accountable. It helps keep us on track spiritually. We all need a steady diet of the Word of God so that we continue to grow in our faith, even during the summer months. I know how quickly the summer and good intentions can slip away, so I recommend getting a plan together and starting right away to stick to it.

Find balance during the summer days ahead. Some parents tend to push really hard academically, even during the summer, while others relax and let down too much. Believe me, I’ve been guilty of both. Summer is a welcome break from the labors of school – but many academic gains can be reversed when we expect far too little of our children from June till August. Something my wife has done since our children were little is to find a workbook for them to complete during the summer. It’s something fun and different from what they do at school, but it’s academically valuable nonetheless. While we’re on vacation, though, we just call it off and do as little as possible for a few days. We all need a break, but the last thing we need is to vegetate for three months!

Keep the Regents vibe rolling. A big part of what makes Regents what it is, as a school, is our culture and expectations of our students. We expect students to be respectful, courteous, diligent, responsible, happily obedient, and accountable. We aim for loving learning, not just going through the motions of assignments and worksheets. So keep it rolling at home. Don’t accept excuses from your children, but instead, expect the best from them. If you’re like me, it’s all too easy to take the path of least resistance, to just let down. But whether it’s taking out the trash, exercising, reading, sitting with good posture, or saying yes ma’am, require your children to do the right thing and hold the standard high.

Finally, enjoy the time. The older I get, the more I sense how time is flying by. As St. James wrote, life is but a vapor that appears for a little time and then vanishes away. So let’s be motivated to enjoy a season of family, leisure, and freedom as a gift from the Lord’s hand.

I hope you have a wonderful summer.

Categories : from the headmaster
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May
27

Awards Ceremonies

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We had a wonderful night honoring our hardworking students, talented teachers, and dedicated volunteers at our Academic Awards Ceremony yesterday. Our school chaplain, Randy Booth, wrote some reflections about the event that are worth reading. Thanks to all our students, parents, and family members who came out to a packed house event. I hope you enjoy Pastor Booth’s comments.

My wife and I attended the end-of-the-year school Award Ceremony last night for our local Classical Christian school. Honestly, my first thought when I heard that it was coming up was not one of excitement but more like concession…okay. Sitting for an hour, or an hour-and-a-half, while lists of names are called out, certificates and medals are handed out, and accomplishments are enumerated could be boring, especially when you don’t personally know most of the people getting the awards. It would be easy to justify staying home and skipping such an event since it seems so routine and unimportant, but that would be a very superficial understanding of what is actually taking place. Upon reflection, I thought about several reasons why participation in these kinds of events is so vital to our communities. Here are three of them:

First, an awards ceremony is not just about me and my children or grandchildren. We are part of something bigger that is of far more value than the sum of its parts. This event is not simply about a particular student receiving an award; it’s about the achievements of the community itself. No student accomplished anything by themselves. Every award represents family, teachers, administrators, staff, board members, donors and others coming together to assist individuals in becoming better than they would have been alone. The student is handed the tangible award but many others are also honored by that award. That student is the work of other hands as well. Our presence at the Awards Ceremony is a small way to recognize that — to honor all those who helped these students and to publicly say “thank you.”

Second, the only way the community can succeed is for all the individual parts of the community to do their share by way of self-sacrifice (which is what love is all about). Coming to the Awards Ceremony is part of the contribution. I could just have the award for my child sent to the house and not have to sit through all of that. Of course there are always a few families that slip out of the ceremony after their child receives their award, but that too misses the bigger point. By sitting through the program we are showing love as we serve one another; we are honoring the other members of our community as well as our children. We are also teaching our children (who might be indifferent, or who might not want to go to the ceremony), that it’s not all about them or us but that, as members of the community, we all have a duty toward others which transcends our personal preferences. This is one of the great lessons of life that our world is lacking (i.e., I am not the center of the universe). Selfishness is immaturity. Maturity is doing our duty toward others; loving our neighbors as ourselves.

Third, an Awards Ceremony provides the opportunity to learn. We have set before our eyes perfect attenders, academic achievers, athletes, artists, and writers. For our children and grandchildren, they learn and practice humility and poise — to stand before a crowd, to represent the community, to be gracious and confident. Younger children get to see the older students and many of them will be inspired to follow those examples. Teachers and staff are also encouraged and satisfied to see that their labors have some immediate and tangible benefits today. Parents also realize that they are not the only ones making these great sacrifices and that the sacrifices are worth it.

So, a full house at an Awards Ceremony is a lovely picture of community — a room full of loving sacrifice to the glory of God!

Categories : school life
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in Nacogdoches, Texas